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Teynham

Teynham

Monday April 9, 2012 on my frist visit to Lyttelton since the Feb 22 2011 earthquake. It was say to see so many buildings gone or about to go.

Lyttelton (Māori: Ōhinehou) is a port town on the north shore of Lyttelton Harbour close to Banks Peninsula, a suburb of Christchurch on the eastern coast of the South Island of New Zealand.

The 2010 Canterbury earthquake damaged some of Lyttelton’s historic buildings, including the Timeball Station. There was some damage to the town’s infrastructure, but the port facilities and tunnel quickly returned to operation. The overall quake damage was less significant than in Christchurch itself, due to the dampening effects of the solid rock that the town rests on and its moderate distance from the epicentre.

On 22 February 2011 a magnitude 6.3 aftershock caused much more widespread damage in Lyttelton than its predecessor due to its proximity to Lyttelton and a shallow depth of 5 kilometres (3.1 mi). Some walls of the Timeball Station collapsed and there was extensive damage to residential and commercial property, leading to the demolition of a number of high profile heritage buildings such as the Harbour Light Theatre and the Empire Hotel. Many other unreinforced masonry buildings were severely damaged.

Following the February earthquake it was suggested that the Timeball Station be dismantled for safety reasons. Bruce Chapman, chief executive of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) said there was a possibility that it may be reconstructed. "If we can find a way to dismantle the Timeball Station that allows us to retain as much of the building’s materials as possible, we will do so." However on Monday 13 June 2011 a further 6.3 ML aftershock brought down the tower and remaining walls while workmen were preparing to dismantle it.

Much of Lyttelton’s architectural heritage was lost as a result of the earthquakes, as damage was deemed too extensive for reconstruction. By June 2011, six buildings in London Street in Lyttelton had been demolished, along with another four on Norwich Quay. The town’s oldest churches have collapsed, including Canterbury’s oldest stone church, the Holy Trinity.

History of Lyttelton:
Due to its establishment as a landing point for Christchurch-bound seafarers, Lyttelton has historically been regarded as the "Gateway to Canterbury" for colonial settlers. The port remains a regular destination for cruise liners and is the South Island’s principal goods transport terminal, handling 34% of exports and 61% of imports by value.

In 2009 Lyttelton was awarded Category I Historic Area status by the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) defined as "an area of special or outstanding historical or cultural heritage significance or value".

A home for Māori for about 700 years, Lyttelton Harbour was discovered by European settlers on 16 February 1770 during the Endeavour’s first voyage to New Zealand.

In August 1849 it was officially proclaimed a port.

Lyttelton was formerly called Port Cooper and Port Victoria. It was the original settlement in the district (1850). The name Lyttelton was given to it in honour of George William Lyttelton of the Canterbury Association, which had led the colonisation of the area.

In 1862, the first telegraph transmission in New Zealand was made from Lyttelton Post Office.

On 1 January 1908, the Nimrod Expedition, headed by Ernest Shackleton to explore Antarctica left from the harbour here.
(From Wikipedia)

Posted by Jocey K on 2012-04-10 00:48:09

Tagged: , new Zealand , Christchurch , Lyttelton , garden , pathway , cottage , sky , building , NZ , hosue , earthquake damage , homes

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How to build a DIY pallet vertical garden.

How to build a DIY pallet vertical garden.

Step 1: Materials for pallet vertical garden
1 wooden pallet ( which is used for transport of goods), a burlap, sturdy garden film, scissors, furniture stapler, universal soil, plant seeds or young seedlings.

How to do it:

Step 2: Attach the burlap to the inside of the pallet. Wrap the back of the pallet with garden film and secure with a furniture stapler. Do this just on three sides (except the top end) by turning the corners.

Step 3: Turn the construction with the open end up and fill the entire volume with soil.

Step 4: Make small cuts with scissors in the burlap and place the seeds or the plant seedlings. It is desirable to keep the pallet in a horizontal position until the germination is guaranteed. It can be flipped vertical when you see that the plants are well “settled down.”

The pallet vertical garden is especially attractive with low herbs ( thyme, mint, lemon balm), twine annuals or perennials (Sweet peas, Cobaea, Morning glory), low-growing flowers (pansies), and even berries (strawberries).

The special thing in this pallet vertical garden is the ability to move the pallet with the plants.

We would like to give a special thank you to www.diy-enthusiasts.com/
You can view the full page here: www.diy-enthusiasts.com/diy-home/build-pallet-vertical-ga…

#liveyourgarden #DIY #DIYideas #springideas #Pallets #palletwood #verticalgarden #Landscaping

Posted by kinsella Landscaping on 2014-09-19 07:32:10

Tagged: , Landscaping , DIY , Projects , Garden , Art , Home , Loveyourgarden , gardenideas , DIYprojects , liveyourgarden , DIYideas , springideas , Pallets , palletwood , verticalgarden

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Kitchen Kraft Covered Casserole Wild Rose Pattern 1930s

Kitchen Kraft Covered Casserole Wild Rose Pattern 1930s

Kitchen Kraft was a division of the Homer Laughlin Company and was manufactured around 1937.

This pretty 8" casserole has 3 odd marks along the top lip where the cooling glaze made a small lump as the pottery cooled in the racks when it was manufactured. The cover has discolored on the unserside and rhere’s a spot on the very edge of the cover… otherwise it’s all pretty nice. No chips, cracks etc.

Surrender Dorothy.
Think of us as your very own cool Auntie’s attic.

Posted by SurrendrDorothy on 2010-11-23 19:43:28

Tagged: , Kitchen Kraft , Covered , Casserole , Wild Rose , 1930s , Depression , Thirties , bakeware , baking , flower , pink , antique , vintage , old , china , Etsy , Artfire , Zibbet , ovenware , lid , dining , kitchen , tableware , shabby , garden , cottage , shabby chic , feminine , pretty , home , goods , Raymond Maine , Maine , white , rosebud , rose , cover , top , girlie , serving , dish , SurrenderDorothy , home decor , home goods , Decor , green , color

Tagged : / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

Kitchen Kraft Covered Casserole Wild Rose Pattern 1930s

Kitchen Kraft Covered Casserole Wild Rose Pattern 1930s

Kitchen Kraft was a division of the Homer Laughlin Company and was manufactured around 1937.

This pretty 8" casserole has 3 odd marks along the top lip where the cooling glaze made a small lump as the pottery cooled in the racks when it was manufactured. The cover has discolored on the unserside and rhere’s a spot on the very edge of the cover… otherwise it’s all pretty nice. No chips, cracks etc.

Surrender Dorothy.
Think of us as your very own cool Auntie’s attic.

Posted by SurrendrDorothy on 2010-11-23 19:43:28

Tagged: , Kitchen Kraft , Covered , Casserole , Wild Rose , 1930s , Depression , Thirties , bakeware , baking , flower , pink , antique , vintage , old , china , Etsy , Artfire , Zibbet , ovenware , lid , dining , kitchen , tableware , shabby , garden , cottage , shabby chic , feminine , pretty , home , goods , Raymond Maine , Maine , white , rosebud , rose , cover , top , girlie , serving , dish , SurrenderDorothy , home decor , home goods , Decor , green , color

Tagged : / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /