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Image from page 257 of “Our homes and their adornments;” (1884)

Image from page 257 of

Identifier: ourhomestheirado01varn
Title: Our homes and their adornments;
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors: Varney, Almon Clother, 1849- [from old catalog]
Subjects: Home economics Interior decoration
Publisher: Detroit, Mich., J. C. Chilton & co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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figures, such as the veinsof leaves, are worked in stem stitch; and small leaves, stems,etc., outside the figures, are worked in embroidery stitches orherring-bone stitch. The paper of the pattern is then tornaway, which is facilitated by slightly moistening it, and thedesign remains on the foundation. The work is rapidly andeasily done, and when the newer and more tasty designs areused, the effect is remarkably good. Drawn Woi^k—Consists in drawing out the threads oflinen and working in patterns with fancy stitches. It isvery popular, and elaborate designs are now made by thismethod, although the work is very trying to the eyes. Embroidery Frames—Are made something after thefashion of quilting frames. Care must be taken to stretchthe material firmly and evenly. 16 Dl^AWN AND I^IBBON ^01^^- AN ANCIENT ART REVIVED.—THE SECRET OF OLD MONAS-TERIES.—EXPLICIT DIRECTIONS FOR DRAWN WORK.—ILLUSTRATIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF THE LATESTDESIGNS.—THE USE OF COLORED SILKS IN.TIIIS WORK.

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HE art of makiug drawn-work is by no meansrecent. In Europe it was known for cen-turies by monks only, and was given to theworld after the breaking up of the monasteries,when ladies of the highest rank eagerljacquired the iirt. In its simplest form drawn work consistsin drawing out threads of the fabric andworking in ])ntterns with fancy stitches, thesimplest form being Tkk IIem-Stitcii. It is made by hrst turning the hem the desired width,to mark the line in the body of the goods where the fii-sttiiread should be drawn. A number of threads are then 1242] OUR HOMES AND THEIR ADORNMENTS. 243 drawn out, more or less in proportion to the fineness of thecloth, and the hem is turned to the outer edge of the drawnspace and carefully basted down.

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Tagged: , bookid:ourhomestheirado01varn , bookyear:1884 , bookdecade:1880 , bookcentury:1800 , bookauthor:Varney__Almon_Clother__1849___from_old_catalog_ , booksubject:Home_economics , booksubject:Interior_decoration , bookpublisher:Detroit__Mich___J__C__Chilton___co_ , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:Sloan_Foundation , bookleafnumber:257 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:americana

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Image from page 315 of “Our homes and their adornments;” (1884)

Image from page 315 of

Identifier: ourhomestheirado01varn
Title: Our homes and their adornments;
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors: Varney, Almon Clother, 1849- [from old catalog]
Subjects: Home economics Interior decoration
Publisher: Detroit, Mich., J. C. Chilton & co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Fig. 71.

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Fig. 73. BEDSTEAD AND DRAPERY. 297 A recent writer on this matter says of the bed-roomtable: Quite an inexpensive one may be made from a dry-goods box three feet high, four wide, and two and a halffeet deep, with four blocks of wood, one inch thick and fourinches square, nailed beneath each corner, to which castersare fastened. The box is placed with open side out, andfitted with a convenient shelf or two. The whole interiorshould be neatly jDapered. On the top at the back, one or two small boxes maybe fastened, and the entire top covered with oil-cloth orother suitable material, and the front may be hung withdrapery concealing the inside shelves. Another plan wouldbe to sand-paper the outside and finish in shellac varnish.Much ingenuity can be displayed and money saved, bywatching the fashion and other journals and carrying outtheir susforestions. *«30^ Bedstead and Drapeky. Our illustration presents a very neat bedstead anddrapery. The hangings are of muslin and net, worked insatin

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-30 02:01:33

Tagged: , bookid:ourhomestheirado01varn , bookyear:1884 , bookdecade:1880 , bookcentury:1800 , bookauthor:Varney__Almon_Clother__1849___from_old_catalog_ , booksubject:Home_economics , booksubject:Interior_decoration , bookpublisher:Detroit__Mich___J__C__Chilton___co_ , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:Sloan_Foundation , bookleafnumber:315 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:americana

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Image from page 54 of “The silk goods of America: a brief account of the recent improvements and advances of silk manufacture in the United States” (1880)

Image from page 54 of

Identifier: silkgoodsofameri01wyck
Title: The silk goods of America: a brief account of the recent improvements and advances of silk manufacture in the United States
Year: 1880 (1880s)
Authors: Wyckoff, William Cornelius, 1832-1888. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Silk industry
Publisher: New York [E. O’Keefe, printer]
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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y all the designs for American rib-bons originate in our factories, frequently months in advance of theintroduction of the goods into the market. These designs have excitedadmiration abroad as well as at home ; they are works of the artist ratherthan of the mere artisan. The novelties of pattern and design compelchanges and improvements in machinery; and better goods result. The statements which have been made elsewhere in this volume, ofthe comparative purity of American silk goods in respect to freedomfrom heavy dye, and as to superiority of the raw silk used, are applicablewith special force to the ribbon manufacture. The loss of trade inforeign ribbons must be in large measure attributed to their being over-weighted, and of inferior silk. This is, of course, most noticeable inblack ribbons, and our manufacturers have taken the opposite coursewith great success, their gros grains being remarkable for purity of dyeand strength of stock. THE SILK GOODS OF AMERICA, 47 <s&i&

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X. Trimmings and Passementerie. HERE are several minor divisions of the trade in fringes,trimmings and passementerie. Of these the mostprominent are— Ladies dress and cloak trimmings, Millinery trimmings, Hatters and furriers trimmings, Upholstery and military passementerie, Coach trimmings. We shall not, however, adhere very closely to these distinctions. Inregard to the most important class of fringes, it should be mentionedthat their manufacture begins in the mills where sewing-silk and machine-twist are made. What is called two-thread fringe silk, is sewing-silk, and three-thread fringe silk is machine-twist. The fringe silkis put up in large skeins and sold to the makers of fringes, who areclassed as manufacturers of trimmings. The marked success that hasbeen attained in this country in making sewings and twist, applies alsoto fringes, and for the same reasons. The raw material is much betterthan that used for such purposes in Europe, and there is far less adulter-ation practis

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-29 18:16:44

Tagged: , bookid:silkgoodsofameri01wyck , bookyear:1880 , bookdecade:1880 , bookcentury:1800 , bookauthor:Wyckoff__William_Cornelius__1832_1888___from_old_catalog_ , booksubject:Silk_industry , bookpublisher:New_York__E__O_Keefe__printer_ , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:The_Library_of_Congress , bookleafnumber:54 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:americana

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Image from page 174 of “A home geography of New York city” (1905)

Image from page 174 of

Identifier: homegeographyofn00stra
Title: A home geography of New York city
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors: Straubenmuller, Gustave
Subjects: New York (N.Y.) — Description and travel New York (N.Y.) — History
Publisher: Boston, New York [etc] Ginn & company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Dutch Windmill 148 HOME GEOGRAPHY OF NEW YORK CITY family gathered around him to hear the latest city news, as well as toadmire what he had in his pack and bargain for what they needed.Wliat would a peddler have in his pack for a father? a mother? agirl? a boy? What is the date of the first Dutch settlement in yourown borough? Find the answer to this question in the book. Doyou live in an old Dutch settlement? If not, how far away from fV^ AWff r^^u mi- {- ^_ «^ V

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Collect Pond as it was in Olden Times Site of city prison at Centre and Leonard streets your school was the first Dutch settlement in your borough? Inwhat direction would you travel to reach the nearest Dutch settle-ment that you know of ? You have learned that the Dutch were fur traders, lumber deal-ers, and farmers. They became very prosperous, and New Amster-dam was the business center of the colony. Ships were constantlyunloading and loading along the docks and wdiarves because ofits extensive commerce. What is a business center ? What did theDutch have in abundance? What did they need that was made in LIFE IN THE DUTCH SETTLEMENTS 149 Europe? What do you think the ships brought to New Amster-dam? What do you think the ships took away? What do we callmen who buy and sell goods? What do we call a man who is incommand of a ship? What do we call the men under liis command?What do we call the men who load and unload vessels? Beaver street was the center of the fur trade. On a counter

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-30 04:26:46

Tagged: , bookid:homegeographyofn00stra , bookyear:1905 , bookdecade:1900 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Straubenmuller__Gustave , booksubject:New_York__N_Y______Description_and_travel , booksubject:New_York__N_Y______History , bookpublisher:Boston__New_York__etc__Ginn___company , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:Sloan_Foundation , bookleafnumber:174 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:americana

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Image from page 290 of “A family flight around home” (1884)

Image from page 290 of

Identifier: familyflightarou00hale
Title: A family flight around home
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors: Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909 Hale, Susan, 1833-1910, joint author
Subjects: New England — Description and travel United States — History
Publisher: Boston, D. Lothrop and company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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sing businessto arrange, and could not leave home until it was settled. Marchwas nearly over before the thirtieth representative arrived. Therewas now a quorum, and the House organized on the thirteenth ofMarch ( 1789). But now a new delay arose. Nothing could bedone till the Senate also had a quorum, and another week wasimpatiently passed in watching every stage-wagon that came to thecity, and asking the name of every traveller. At last, on themorning of the sixth of April, a messenger knocked at the doorof the House and informed the Speaker that the Senate wasready to count the electoral vote. The members hastened to theSenate Chamber, and the ballots were opened, read off, andrecorded. The Houses then separated. When the Representativeswere once more in their seats, the Speaker announced the result.George Washington had received sixty-nine, John Adams thirty- 286 A FAMILY FLIGHT ABOUND HOME. four votes. Thus were elected the first President and Vice-Presi-dent of the United States.

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MKST IKAVKK IN CUNUKKSb. The two Houses of Congress had their hands full of other busi-ness at once, and advice of all kinds was showered upon them, CONGRESS. 287 especially upon the subject of the importation of British goods.It was said that if the country was to prosper, it must spend less•on foreign goods, and learn to manufacture its own. It wasplainly the duty of Congress to spare no pains to restrain impor-tation and encourage home manufacture. The advice was sound, and had begun already to be acted on by thepeople. In every great city so- s- . ^ -^ cieties for the encouragement ofmanufactures were flourishing.The members of the society inDelaware took a solemn pledgeto appear on the first day ofJanuary, in each year, clothedin goods of American make. The result of such resolveswas a speedy return to oldhabits of simplicity and frugality.Young women wore plain clothes,and made haste to surpass theirmothers in skill at the spinning-wheel. Young men were notashamed to be seen i

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-30 09:32:34

Tagged: , bookid:familyflightarou00hale , bookyear:1884 , bookdecade:1880 , bookcentury:1800 , bookauthor:Hale__Edward_Everett__1822_1909 , bookauthor:Hale__Susan__1833_1910__joint_author , booksubject:New_England____Description_and_travel , booksubject:United_States____History , bookpublisher:Boston__D__Lothrop_and_company , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:Sloan_Foundation , bookleafnumber:290 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:americana

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Image from page 39 of “A family flight around home” (1884)

Image from page 39 of

Identifier: familyflightarou00hale
Title: A family flight around home
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors: Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909 Hale, Susan, 1833-1910, joint author
Subjects: New England — Description and travel United States — History
Publisher: Boston, D. Lothrop and company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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go Lawrence was a mere handful of houses;Manchester was no better. When the census was taken in 1820,the country around Lowell was a wilderness where sportsmen shotgame. The falls which now furnish power to innumerable loomswere all unused, and the two hundred sole inhabitants of the townfound their support in the sturgeon and alewives taken from thewaters of the Concord and the Merrimac. At that time no manufactories could be said to exist with theexception of a few mills for making paper, scarce so good in qualityas that grocers are now accustomed to wrap around pounds ofsugar and tea; a foundry or two where iron was melted into rude,;igs, or beaten into bars of iron ; or a factory where cocked-hatsand felts were made. IN THE TRAIN. 35 As for cotton manufacture, the first cotton mill was not erectedin New England at the time the Constitution was formed. Theplace now held by cotton fabrics was filled by linen spun at everyfarmers hearth. To spin well was then esteemed an accoraplish-

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THE SMALL WHEEL. ment, like playing on the piano, or painting china at present, andevery damsel of the old time was proud to excel in it. The spinning bee was once the fashion among the rich; it continuedin vogue in many country towns when the ladies of the great 36 A FAMILY FLIGHT AKOUND HOME. cities had deserted the wheel for the harpsichord and the spinet.The bee was generally held in the town hall; but if the villagewas not prosperous enough to contain such a building, the houseof some minister was chosen. Thither the women went with theirspinning-wheels and flax, and as they spun were brought cake andwine by the fine gentlemen of the town. All this spinning is done away with by the introduction ofmachinery, and flax and linen have yielded for most householdpurposes to cotton and cotton goods. Did you ever see a spinning-wheel.? Mr. Horner asked ofHubert. Hubert was doubtful. Aunt Augusta has one, answered Tom, in a corner of herparlor, all tied up in blue ribbon like a pet dog. I

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Tagged: , bookid:familyflightarou00hale , bookyear:1884 , bookdecade:1880 , bookcentury:1800 , bookauthor:Hale__Edward_Everett__1822_1909 , bookauthor:Hale__Susan__1833_1910__joint_author , booksubject:New_England____Description_and_travel , booksubject:United_States____History , bookpublisher:Boston__D__Lothrop_and_company , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:Sloan_Foundation , bookleafnumber:39 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:americana

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