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Picture Of 2013 Holiday Window 3 Of Scully & Scully Located At 504 Park Avenue At 59th Street In New York City. Scully & Scully Is A High End Home Goods Store. Photo Taken Thursday December 19, 2013

Picture Of 2013 Holiday Window 3 Of Scully & Scully Located At 504 Park Avenue At 59th Street In New York City. Scully & Scully Is A High End Home Goods Store. Photo Taken Thursday December 19, 2013

Picture Of 2013 Holiday Window 3 Of Scully & Scully Located At 504 Park Avenue At 59th Street In New York City. Scully & Scully Is A High End Home Goods Store Offering Luxury Gifts And Furniture From The Tiniest Knickknacks To The Largest Dining Room Sets. You Name It, They’ve Got It: Jewelry, Clocks, Leather Goods, Silver, China, Crystal, Lamps And One Of The Planet’s Most Impressive Collections Of Herend Porcelain. Consider This Business For Wedding Or Anniversary Gifts. Photo Taken Thursday December 19, 2013.

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Posted by ses7 on 2013-12-23 03:06:18

Tagged: , 2013 , Christmas , Decoration’s , In , New , York , City

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Picture Of 2013 Holiday Window 2 Of Scully & Scully Located At 504 Park Avenue At 59th Street In New York City. Scully & Scully Is A High End Home Goods Store. Photo Taken Thursday December 19, 2013

Picture Of 2013 Holiday Window 2 Of Scully & Scully Located At 504 Park Avenue At 59th Street In New York City. Scully & Scully Is A High End Home Goods Store. Photo Taken Thursday December 19, 2013

Picture Of 2013 Holiday Window 2 Of Scully & Scully Located At 504 Park Avenue At 59th Street In New York City. Scully & Scully Is A High End Home Goods Store Offering Luxury Gifts And Furniture From The Tiniest Knickknacks To The Largest Dining Room Sets. You Name It, They’ve Got It: Jewelry, Clocks, Leather Goods, Silver, China, Crystal, Lamps And One Of The Planet’s Most Impressive Collections Of Herend Porcelain. Consider This Business For Wedding Or Anniversary Gifts. Photo Taken Thursday December 19, 2013.

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Posted by ses7 on 2013-12-23 03:06:17

Tagged: , 2013 , Christmas , Decoration’s , In , New , York , City

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Image from page 43 of “Little journeys to the homes of the great” (1916)

Image from page 43 of

Identifier: littlejourneystov11hubb
Title: Little journeys to the homes of the great
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Hubbard, Elbert, 1856-1915 Hoyle, John T. (John Thomas), b. 1873, ed
Subjects: Biography
Publisher: New York, Chicago, W. H. Wise & co
Contributing Library: Brigham Young University Hawaii, Joseph F. Smith Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Consortium of Church Libraries and Archives

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eachers accepted the invitation,with the intent to convert Robert Owen to their par-ticular cause. New Lanark was pointed out all overEngland as a godless town. The bishops issued a generaladdress to all rectors and curates warning them againstany system of morals that does away with God and36 ROBERT OWEN His Son, Jesus Christ, fixing its salvation on flowerbedsand ragged schools. New Lanark was making money because it was pro-ducing goods the world wanted. But its workers weretabu in respectable society, and priestly hands wereheld aloft in pretended horror whenever the name ofRobert Owen, or the word Socialism/ was used 33Owen refused to employ child labor, and issued a bookdirecting the attention of society to this deadly trafficin human beings. The parents, the clergy and the othermill-owners combined against him, and he was de-nounced by press and pulpit. He began to look around for a better environment foran ideal community. His gaze was turned towardAmerica 33 33 37 ROBERT OWEN

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OBERT OWENS plan for abolishing viceand poverty was simply to set the peopleto work under ideal conditions, and thenallow them time enough for recreation andmental exercise, so that thrift might follow farming.In reply to the argument that the workman shouldevolve his own standard of life, independent of hisemployer, Owen said that the mill with its vast aggre-gation of hands was an artificial condition. The inven-tion, ingenuity and enterprise that evolved the millwere exceptional. The operators for the most part lackedthis constructive genius, the proof of which lay in thevery fact that they were operators.To take advantage of their limitations, disrupt theirnatural and accustomed mode of life, and then throwthe blame back upon them for not evolving a newand better environment, was neither reasonable norright S3 S3 The same constructive genius that built the mill andoperated it should be actively interested in the welfareof the people who worked in the mill.To this end there should

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-28 03:05:23

Tagged: , bookid:littlejourneystov11hubb , bookyear:1916 , bookdecade:1910 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Hubbard__Elbert__1856_1915 , bookauthor:Hoyle__John_T___John_Thomas___b__1873__ed , booksubject:Biography , bookpublisher:New_York__Chicago__W__H__Wise___co , bookcontributor:Brigham_Young_University_Hawaii__Joseph_F__Smith_Library , booksponsor:Consortium_of_Church_Libraries_and_Archives , bookleafnumber:43 , bookcollection:brighamyounguniversityhawaii , bookcollection:americana

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Image from page 302 of “A family flight around home” (1884)

Image from page 302 of

Identifier: familyflightarou00hale
Title: A family flight around home
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors: Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909 Hale, Susan, 1833-1910, joint author
Subjects: New England — Description and travel United States — History
Publisher: Boston, D. Lothrop and company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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the people of the Eastern States. He went throughConnecticut, passed a few days at Boston, rode thence to NewHampshire, and came back by another route from that by whichhe went. Everywhere he was received with a great show of Fed-eral spirit. Bonfires were lighted, triumphal arches put up, feastsmade ready, and odes written in his honor. The President re-turned to New York later in the fall, most favorably impressedwith the state of feeling in New England. 2!t8 A FAMILY FLIGHT AROUND HOME. At the time of Washingtons tour, two stages and twelve horses-sufficed to carry all the travellers and goods passing between NewYork and Boston. These conveyances were old and shaky, thebeasts were ill-fed and worn to skeletons. On summer-days thestages usually made forty miles, but in winter, when the snowwas deep, and the darkness came on early in the afternoon, rarelymore than twenty-five. In the hot months the traveller was op-pressed by heat and half choked with dust, while in cold weather is.

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•<W vva.siiin(;ton on his tour. he could scarcely keep from freezing. One pair of horses usuallydragged the stage some eighteen miles, when fresh ones were putin, and if no accident occurred, the traveller was put down at theinn about ten at night. Cramped and weary, he ate a frugalsupper and betook himself to bed, to be called at three the next WASHINGTONS INAUGURATION. 299 morning, then to rise, and make ready, by the light of a horn-lantern^ or a farthing candle for another ride of eighteen hours. John Adams, the first Vice-President, had been one of the fore-most of the patriots from the outbreak of the Revolution. He assistedin the framing of the Declaration of Independence, and was oneof the ambassadors to make the treaty with France at the closeof the Revolution; and in 1785 was sent as American minister toEngland, a difficult position for which he was well-fitted by nature and experience. He became the second President of the United States afterWashington, who served two

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-30 09:33:10

Tagged: , bookid:familyflightarou00hale , bookyear:1884 , bookdecade:1880 , bookcentury:1800 , bookauthor:Hale__Edward_Everett__1822_1909 , bookauthor:Hale__Susan__1833_1910__joint_author , booksubject:New_England____Description_and_travel , booksubject:United_States____History , bookpublisher:Boston__D__Lothrop_and_company , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:Sloan_Foundation , bookleafnumber:302 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:americana

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